Questionmark Perception
Oct 16 2018 |
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Introduction


Quickscan HAVO Engels

Question

1
 
Postcards on the edge

The digital age spells the end of a venerable vacation tradition. But are e-cards and text messages really better?

IT'S AMUSING THAT SO MANY MAGAZINE travel columns are entitled 'Postcard from...'. Because unless we're talking about e-cards, people just aren't sending them like they used to. Not in an age of e-mail, text messaging and mobile phones equipped with cameras. Other than the prepaid advertising cards put out by direct-mailing houses, chances are that the only postcards you receive these days are from elderly relatives.
A recent poll conducted by British tour operator Thomson Holidays found that of 1,000 customers surveyed, 50% intended to send fewer postcards in the future. Tourists visiting the U.K. seem to be of a similar mind: Royal Mail statistics show the number of postcards mailed in Britain is falling by about 1 million each year - at a current 25 million, down from 30 million five years ago. The downward trend can be seen elsewhere. The Finland Post Corp. blames text messaging for the decline in the volume of postcards sent, while in Japan there are plans to axe 80% of the country's postcard-vending machines. At this rate, postcards seem destined to go the way of the telex.
The time it takes to deliver a postcard is out of sync with the way we holiday now. In the Thomson poll, 25% of respondents said postcards took too long to arrive. That may not have been true 20 years ago, when people went on trips of lavish duration - a three-week meander through Europe, say, or a month long U.S. tour. But in these days of city breaks and three-night packages, you usually get home before your postcards do.
As holiday rituals go, it's commonly supposed that there's nothing nicer than sitting in a Florentine café or Beijing teahouse, with postcards fanned in front of you to craft elegant missives to loved ones. But the attractions of sending your wish-you-were-heres digitally are harder to resist. Techno-hipsters post their itineraries on a Friendster bulletin board, a great way to keep peers informed and gather travel tips. Why queue in a dingy post office when you can just use your phone to take a picture of the Acropolis or the Kremlin and fire it off to anyone you like? If you don't have a phone with a built-in camera, you can use your laptop: the Web is filled with e-card sites that allow you to click on images of well known attractions and send them with your message to multiple recipients. You'll find e-cards of everything from Vancouver's Stanley Park(canadianculture.com) to Australia's Great Ocean Road (southwestvictoria.com).
There is one major downside of the postcard's passing, however: it is frequently being replaced by the lengthy travel diary that your vacationing friends feel compelled to send from every Internet café they visit. Technology has suddenly made it all too easy to dispatch gushing, gee-whiz accounts of trips to the Pompidou or dives off the Great Barrier Reef, not to mention tediously unedited recollections of meals eaten on Brazilian Beaches or at Bangkok Street stalls. When several paragraphs about transport hassles and mundane hotel mix-ups are tacked on, you start to realize that whatever the postcard's failings, it at least had the merit of brevity.
TIME



"The digital age spells the end of a venerable vacation tradition." (inleiding)
Wordt er behalve technologie nog een reden in de tekst genoemd die de afgenomen populariteit van het versturen van ansichtkaarten verklaart? Zo nee, antwoord 'Nee'. Zo ja, vink de eerste twee woorden aan van de alinea waarin deze reden staat.

Question

2
“But are e-cards and text messages really better?” (inleiding)
Wordt er in de tekst een voordeel genoemd van het versturen van ansichtkaarten?
Zo nee, antwoord “Nee”. Zo ja, vink de eerste twee woorden aan van de alinea waarin dit voordeel staat.

Question

3
 
Finding our feet

If there is one thing that ought to need no intervention by the government it is getting people to walk more. It should be self-evident. Walking is enjoyable in itself and it is well proven that moderate exercise reduces the risk of obesity, stress, heart disease, strokes and other illnesses. And if that isn't .....1....., then the prospect of avoiding traffic congestion, pollution, towering petrol taxes, parking problems and high train fares ought to be. .....2....., this is not the case. As the Department for Transport's action plan, Walking and Cycling, pointed out last week, walking trips - other than for recreational purposes - have been in decline for 20 years. It would not take much to reverse it - just walking 1.25 miles a week more on average - but there is no sign of revival.
    The chief medical officer urges us to take at least 30 minutes of physical activity of moderate intensity on at least five days a week. It doesn't have to be walking: anything from cycling to housework would do. But cycling without proper uninterrupted cycle lanes can be dangerous and not everyone can afford a health club. Walking is easy and more sociable than other forms of exercise. Many would be surprised what little .....3..... they lose by walking part of the way to work rather than taking a bus or train once all the delays have been factored in.
    There are lots of things the authorities can do nationally and locally, such as improving pavements, creating more safe routes to schools and making more traffic-free areas. With obesity costing the country approaching £10bn a year, putting the country back on its feet would be .....4..... It is the nearest thing politicians will get to a free lunch.

The Guardian



Welk van de volgende mogelijkheden past het best op de open plek in de tekst bij [1]?

Question

4
Welk van de volgende mogelijkheden past het best op de open plek in de tekst bij [2]?

Question

5
Welk van de volgende mogelijkheden past het best op de open plek in de tekst bij [3]?

Question

6
Welk van de volgende mogelijkheden past het best op de open plek in de tekst bij [4]?

Question

7
The captain, the passenger and one ironic comment

1 Passenger Clive Warshaw was barred from a Virgin flight last week after making an ironic comment to a pilot who turned up late for a flight already delayed by 13 hours.
2 Is this pilot power gone mad? Warshaw, who paid £3,500 for his business-class return to Miami, thinks so. "You have to question the captain’s psychological balance. He looked as if he’d just been dragged out of bed and was clearly in a foul mood. All I said was ‘well done’. If that’s all it takes to make him crack, you wonder how he’d cope under pressure at 33,000ft."
3 Virgin, which has offered £2,000 and 80,000 air miles as compensation, stands by its man and says: "The captain felt Mr Warshaw’s behaviour suggested he could be disruptive during the flight. He was therefore fully justified in not letting him board." Warshaw is unrepentant: "I have three witnesses from the flight who’ve written to Virgin in my defence - one of them works for the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)."
4 Was the pilot acting lawfully? According to the CAA’s Air Navigation Order, "every person in an aircraft shall obey all lawful commands which the commander of that aircraft may give for the purposes of securing the safety of the aircraft ... or the efficiency or regularity of air navigation". Was Warshaw disobeying commands? Clearly not. Was he a threat to the "efficiency or regularity of air navigation"? He says no, the captain says potentially yes, end of story.
5 So far, so lawful, but was the pilot being fair? "It doesn’t sound like it," says Tony Dixon, editor of Airliner World. "If all Mr Warshaw said was ‘well done’, well, it is a bit harsh, isn’t it?"
6 Dixon believes a tabloid thirst for 'air rage' reports may have made pilots more twitchy than in the past. Ironically, CAA reports suggest a decline in disruptive behaviour on UK airlines (last year you had to fly 36,000 times to encounter a serious incident). But in this case at least, it seems the pilot was taking no chances. You have been warned - an ironic comment could see you left on the runway.


"The captain, the passenger and one ironic comment" (titel)
Wat was dit ironic comment? Geef antwoord door middel van een citaat uit de tekst.

Question

8
Which of the following does Clive Warshaw express in paragraph 2?
1 Concern about the pilot’s ability to remain calm in an emergency.
2 Displeasure at the high price of the flight.

Question

9
How is the pilot’s decision to bar Clive Warshaw characterised in paragraphs 4 and 5?
1 As in accordance with the rules.
2 As severe.

Question

10
Which of the following appears to be a function of this article?